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2026 World Cup host cities: Full list of stadiums in USA, Canada and Mexico

2026 World Cup host cities

The FIFA World Cup 2026 will be held across three North American countries: Canada, Mexico and the United States of America (USA).

It is the first football World Cup to be hosted across three nations, and the first since 2002 to be hosted by more than one nation. In that edition, where Brazil triumphed 2-0 over Germany in the final, South Korea and Japan were joint hosts.

The North American trio's bid triumphed over a bid by Morocco. The final vote was held at the 86th FIFA Congress in Moscow in 2018, held on the eve of the 2018 World Cup, which was won by France with a 4-2 final victory against Croatia. The Canada-Mexico-USA bid received 134 votes, Morocco received 65 votes, while Iran refused to vote for either country.

Key facts about the 2026 World Cup location

  • It is the first men's World Cup since 2002 to be hosted across more than one country.
  • It is the first football World Cup to be hosted across three countries.
  • Canada will be the fifth country to host both a men's and women's World Cup. They hosted the 2015 Women's World Cup.
  • Mexico will become the first country ever to host three men's World Cups, having hosted alone in 1970 and 1986.
  • The United States will be the first country to host the men's and women's World Cups both on two separate occasions (men's: 1994, 2026; women's: 1999, 2003).
Mexico fans celebrate having three 2026 World Cup host cities at the 2022 FIFA World Cup in Qatar
Mexican fans at the 2022 World Cup, in anticipation of hosting the next edition | Photo by Harry Langer/DeFodi Images/Icon Sport.

How many cities are in the World Cup 2026?

There are sixteen 2026 World Cup host cities. Eleven are in the USA, three in Mexico and two in Canada.

However, the World Cup will not be organised country-by-country, but rather in a regional format.

Western Division: Vancouver (Canada), Guadalajara (Mexico), Seattle, San Francisco and Los Angeles (all USA).

Central Division: Monterrey, Mexico City (both Mexico), Kansas City, Dallas, Houston and Atlanta (all USA).

Eastern Division: Toronto (Canada), Boston, New York City, Philadelphia and Miami (all USA).

2026 World Cup host cities bidding process

Once the North American bid for the tournament had won, cities in each of the three countries began vying to be one of the 16 chosen.

In total, 41 cities were involved in the bidding process to be host cities. This included 45 stadiums, two of which had yet to be built at the time.

The FIFA World Cup trophy
Photo by Jessica Alcheh-USA TODAY Sports/Sipa USA/Icon Sport

Nine of these cities and arenas were rejected at the first stage of the process, and a further nine stadiums and cities after a second phase.

Three other stadiums in three cities withdrew themselves from the process due to frustration at FIFA's reluctance to discuss financial details. These three cities were Chicago, Minneapolis and Vancouver. The latter then rejoined Canada's bid when Montreal dropped out after being unable to source funding to renovate their Olympic Stadium.

This left a final number of 24 stadiums in 24 cities, which was then whittled down to 16, announced by FIFA on 16 June 2022.

There are some basic FIFA regulations that must be met to be a World Cup host stadium. This includes capacity requirements, of a minimum of 40,000 for group stage games, 60,000 for quarter-finals and for the opening game or World Cup final, 80,000 capacity.

Full list of 2026 World Cup host stadiums

World Cup 2026 Stadiums Map
A map of all the 2026 World Cup stadiums. Photo by FIFA.com

2026 World Cup host cities in the USA (11)

Lumen Field, Seattle

Matches: 

16 (15th June), 32 (19th June), 52 (24th June), 63 (26th June) 82 (1st July), 94 (6th July)

Location: Seattle, Washington, USA
Capacity: 69,000 (up to 72,000)
Opened: 2002
Cost: $430m
Hosted football before: Yes
Main use: Home to the Seattle Seahawks (NFL), Seattle Sounders FC (MLS), OL Reign (NWSL),
Roof: No
Architects: Ellerbe Becket + LMN Architects

 

Levi’s Stadium, San Francisco

Matches:

8 (13th June), 20 (16th June), 31 (19th June) 44 (22nd June), 60 (25th June), 81 (1st July)

Location: Santa Clara, California, USA
Capacity: 70,909
Opened: 2014
Cost: $1.3bn
Hosted football before: Yes
Main use: Home to the San Francisco 49ers (NFL)
Roof: No
Architects: HNTB

SoFi Stadium, Los Angeles

Matches:

4 (12th June), 15 (15th June), 26 (18th June), 39 (21st June), 59 (25th June)

Round of 32: Match 73 (28th June) Match 84 (2nd July)

QF: Match 98 (10th July)

Location: Inglewood, California, USA
Capacity: 70,240
Opened: 2020
Cost: $5.5bn (including wider development)
Hosted football before: Yes
Main use: Home to Los Angeles Rams and Los Angeles Chargers (NFL)
Roof: Yes
Architects: HKS

The SoFi Stadium in Inglewood near Los Angeles | One of the 2026 World Cup host stadiums
The SoFi Stadium | Photo by Kirby Lee-USA TODAY Sports/Sipa USA/Icon Sport

Arrowhead Stadium, Kansas City

Matches: 

19 (16th June), 34 (20th June), 58 (26th June), 69 (27th June)

Round of 32: Match 87 (3rd July)

QF: Match 100 (11th July)

Location: Kansas City, Missouri, USA
Capacity: 76,416
Opened: 1972
Cost: $43m (initial), $375m (2007-2010 renovation)
Hosted football before: Yes
Main use: Home to the Kansas City Chiefs (NFL)
Roof: No
Architects: Kivett & Myers

AT&T Stadium, Arlington

Matches:

11 (14th June), 22 (17th June), 43 (22nd June), 57 (25th June), 70 (27th June)

Round of 32: Match 78 (30th June), 88 (3rd July)

Round of 16: Match 93 (6th July)

SF: Match 101 (14th July)

Location: Arlington, Texas (near Dallas), USA
Capacity: 
80-105,000
Opened: 
2009
Cost:
 $1.3bn
Hosted football before: 
Yes
Main use: 
Home of NFL team Dallas Cowboys
Roof: 
Yes, retractable
Architects: HKS

AT&T Stadium in Arlington, Texas | Potential 2026 World Cup final stadium and one of 11 2026 World Cup host cities in the USA
The AT&T Stadium could be the host stadium for the 2026 World Cup final | Photo by Jerome Miron-USA TODAY Sports/Sipa USA/Icon Sport

Mercedes-Benz Stadium, Atlanta

Matches:

14 (15th June), 25 (18th June), 38 (21st June), 50 (24th June), 72 (27th June)

Round of 32: Match 80 (1st July)

Round of 16: Match 95 (7th July)

SF: Match 102 (15th July)

Location: Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Capacity: 71,000-83,000
Opened: 2017
Cost: $1.6bn
Hosted football before: Yes
Main use: Home to the Atlanta Falcons (NFL) and Atlanta United FC (MLS)
Roof: Yes, retractable
Architects: HOK (now Populous)

NRG Stadium, Houston

Matches: 

10 (14th June), 23 (17th June), 35 (20th June), 47 (23rd June), 65 (26th June)

Round of 32: Match 76 (29th June)

Round of 16: Match 90 (4th July)

Location: Houston, Texas, USA
Capacity: 72,220
Opened: 2002
Cost: $352m
Hosted football before: Yes
Main use: Home to Houstan Texans (NFL) and often US men's national soccer team and Mexico national football team.
Roof: Yes, retractable.
Architects: Populous

Gillette Stadium, Boston

Matches:

5 (13th June), 18 (16th June), 30 (19th June), 45 (23rd June), 61 (26th June)

Round of 32: Match 74 (29th June)

QF: Match 97 (9th July)

Location: Foxborough, Massachusetts, USA
Capacity: 65,878-70,000
Opened: 2002
Cost: $325m
Hosted football before: 
Main use: Home to the New England Patriots (NFL) and New England Revolution (MLS)
Roof: No
Architects: HOK (now Populous)

Lincoln Financial Field, Philadelphia

Matches:

9 (14th June), 29 (19th June), 42 (22nd June), 55 (25th June), 68 (27th June)

Round of 16: Match 89 (4th July)

Location: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
Capacity: 69,328
Opened: 2003
Cost: $512m
Hosted football before: Yes
Main use: Home to the Philadelphia Eagles (NFL)
Roof: No
Architects: NBBJ

Hard Rock Stadium, Miami

Matches:

13 (15th June), 37 (21st June), 49 (24th June), 71 (27th June)

Round of 32: Match 86 (3rd July)

QF: Match 99 (11th July)

Bronze Final: Match 103 (18th July)

Location: Miami Gardens, Florida, USA
Capacity: 67,518
Opened: 1987
Cost: $115m
Hosted football before: Yes
Main use: Home to the Miami Dolphins (NFL)
Roof: No
Architects: HOK (now Populous)

MetLife Stadium, New Jersey

Matches:

7 (13th June), 17 (16th June), 41 (22nd June) 56 (25th June) 67 (27th June)

Round of 32: Match 77 (30th June)

Round of 16: Match 91 (5th July)

Final: Match 101 (19th July)

Location: East Rutherford, New Jersey, USA
Capacity:
 82,500
Opened: 2010
Cost: $1.6bn
Hosted football before: Yes
Main use: Home of NFL teams New York Giants and New York Jets
Roof: No
Architects: HOK (now Populous)

New York/New Jersey MetLife Stadium - the potential 2026 World Cup Final stadium and one of the 2026 World Cup host cities in the USA
Manchester United celebrate scoring against Arsenal at the MetLife Stadium in July 2023 | Photo by Vincent Carchietta-USA TODAY Sports/Sipa USA/Icon Sport

2026 World Cup host cities in Mexico (3)

Estadio Akron, Guadalajara

Matches:

2 (11th June), 28 (18th June), 48 (23rd June), 66 (26th June)

Location: Zapopan, Mexico
Capacity: 48,071
Opened: 2010
Cost: $200m
Hosted football before: Yes
Main use: Home of CD Guadalajara (Liga MX)
Roof: No
Architects: Jean Marie Massaud & Daniel Pouzet, Populous, VFO

Estádio BBVA BANCOMER, Monterrey

Matches:

12 (14th June) 36 (20th June), 54 (24th June)

Round of 32: Match 75 (29th June)

Location: Guadalupe, Mexico
Capacity: 53,500
Opened: 2015
Cost: $200m
Hosted football before: Yes
Main use: Home of CF Monterrey (Liga MX)
Roof: No
Architects: Populous/VFO

Estadio Azteca, Mexico City

Matches:

1 (11th June), 24 (17th June), 53 (24th June)

Round of 32: Match 79 (30th June)

Round of 17 Match 92 (5th July)

Location: Mexico City, Mexico
Capacity: 87,523
Opened: 1966 (renovated 1986, 1999, 2013, 2016)
Cost: MAX$260m
Hosted football before: Yes, including two World Cup finals (1970, 1986)
Main use: Home of Club America, Cruz Azul (Liga MX) and the Mexico national team
Roof: No
Architects: Pedro Ramírez Vázquez + Rafael Mijares

Estadio Azteca | Host of the 1986 World Cup Final and host city for the 2026 World Cup
The Estadio Azteca hosted the 1970 and 1986 World Cup finals | Photo by Michel Barrault/Onze/Icon Sport

2026 World Cup host cities in Canada (2)

BC Place Stadium, Vancouver

Matches:

6 (13th June), 27 (18th June), 40 (21st June), 51 (24th June), 64 (26th June)

Round of 32: Match 85 (2nd July)

Location: Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
Capacity: 54,405
Opened: 1983 (renovated 2009, 2011)
Cost: Can$307m
Hosted football before: Yes
Main use: Home of the Vancouver Whitecaps (MLS)
Roof: Yes, retractable
Architects: Studio Phillips Barratt

BMO Field, Toronto

Matches:

3 (12th June), 21 (17th June), 33 (20th June), 46 (23rd June), 62 (26th June)

Round of 32: Match 83 (2nd July)

Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Capacity: 45,736
Opened: 2007
Cost: Can$62,9m
Hosted football before: Yes
Main use: Home of Toronto FC (MLS)
Roof: No
Architects: Brisbin Brooks Beynon Architects

2026 World Cup semi-final stadiums

FIFA regulations stipulate that World Cup quarter-final venues must have a minimum capacity of 60,000 to meet demand. So, while there has been no announcement made yet of the 2026 World Cup semi-final host stadiums, we can rule out a few to begin with.

The stadiums which will be unable to host the World Cup semi-finals in 2026 are Guadalajara's Estadio Akron, Monterrey's Estadio BBVA Bancomer, Toronto's BMO Field and Vancouver's BC Place Stadium.

The stadiums eligible to host the semi-finals are all 11 of those in the USA and Mexico City's iconic Estadio Azteca.

What city will host 2026 World Cup final?

The 2026 World Cup final host stadium is yet to be announced but we know a decision is coming soon and two venues are in the running: Arlington's AT&T Stadium and New Jersey's MetLife Stadium. Read more about the decision on the World Cup final stadium here on Football Ground Guide.

Where is the next World Cup 2030?

The bidding process for the 24th FIFA World Cup, and the centennial competition, was launched in 2022 and there are two major candidates, both of which are joint bids.

Europe will compete to host it with a Spain–Portugal–Morocco bid, while South America are presenting a remarkable four-country bid of Uruguay–Argentina–Chile–Paraguay. The latter would return the World Cup to Uruguay, who hosted the very first edition in 1930, which they won.


Harry Robinson

A freelance writer and broadcaster, Harry has worked for or featured in/on Manchester United, FourFourTwo, The Independent, The Manchester Mill, UEFA, United We Stand and many others. He's the author of The Men Who Made Manchester United and hosts the Manchester United Weekly Podcast and United Through Time. A Stretford End season ticket holder, Harry travels around Europe to watch his team.

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