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England fans face huge fine in Germany due to obscure law

England fans travelling to Germany this summer for Euro 2024 have already been given plenty of warnings about what might happen if they misbehave during the tournament. Passports have been confiscated from banned fans while those going have been warned about the strength of German beer.

British police have also told fans to use ‘common sense' when it comes to adhering to German public order laws while German police have said they are ready to march offenders to the nearest bank to pay fans immediately if they do fall foul of any.

With two weeks to go until the tournament begins, a new warning has come the way of England fans but this time it isn't anything to do with their potential behaviour, but rather their potential outfit choices.

england fans face fine
England fans face a hefty fine if they choose to wear a fake version of the England shirt this summer – Photo by Icon Sport

England fans could breach German trademark laws

In Germany, wearing a counterfeit England shirt (or any counterfeit piece of clothing) could land fans a hefty fine of up to £4,000. The German trademark laws mean that it is effectively illegal to wear a fake football top according to the law firm, Cohausz & Florack.

Due to the sky-high costs of official football shirts in the UK, many fans have turned to fake or rip-off versions in recent years. When you consider that the current England shirt is being sold on the official England store website for £84.99, it's hardly a surprise that fans are turning to the black market to buy memorabilia.

Kids' shirts aren't anywhere near as cheap as they used to be, either, which can put huge pressure on parents during difficult financial times. The current kids' England home kit is being sold for £54.99 via official avenues, however, fans could get it for much cheaper on the black market.

Due to how common these rip-off shirts now are, it isn't inconceivable that some fans will fall foul of this trademark law this summer. However, on the flip side, the German police may have enough on their plates before they consider prosecuting people for wearing a fake football top.


Andy Delaney

Andy is a freelance sports writer with ten years of experience covering major sporting events across Europe. He has also been a season ticket holder at Old Trafford since 2008 and has visited over 40 football stadiums in the United Kingdom and abroad following the Reds.

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