Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Post Type Selectors
Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Post Type Selectors

Japanese ultras unveil massive Tifo the width of an entire stand

In the modern era, the reputation of football ultras has taken a hit, with society becoming less tolerant of the violence and abuse that is occasionally linked with such groups.

However, there is plenty of good that ultras still do for the sport and a section of the crown at a J1 League match between Kashima Antlers vs Cerezo Osaka proved that to be the case after unveiling an astonishing Tifo ahead of the game.

Japanese ultras brandish a stand-wide Tifo

The TIFO displayed during a match between Kashima Antlers vs Cerezo Osaka
Japanese ultras went to extreme lengths to construct a truly wonderful Tifo. Photo by Ultras World via X

Proof that not all ultras are bad

As mentioned, it feels as though in recent years, ultras have become somewhat of a scapegoat for the violence that still exists within the sport. To some degree, this is to be expected given the group's deep-rooted connection to football hooliganism in the past.

However, when executed in the correct manner, ultras can still be an asset to the sport, and of course to their team, creating an intense atmosphere that intimidates the opposition – albeit without offending or abusing them.

The supporters highlighted in this article are a testament to this statement, and are proof that ultras still have plenty to offer the sport of football.

The norm in Japan

In truth, violence at football matches is a rarity in Japan and violent ultras are incredibly few and far between. Contrasting what we are used to in England, and most of Europe for that matter, there are very few stewards and police in attendance at these games – and rival fans are even allowed to travel on the same trains.

Unlike in Europe, drinking culture is also far less prominent in Japanese football, and many have cited this as the main reason for the absence of violence before, during or after matches.


Harry Dowsett

Freelance football writer with experience writing for multiple digital platforms, such as GIVEMESPORT. Recently graduated from Portsmouth University with a media studies degree - completing a dissertation on the evolution of sports journalism in the process. He has a love for Arsenal Football Club and a passion for football as a whole.

Articles: 90