Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Post Type Selectors
Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Post Type Selectors

Wembley Stadium announce first 100% recyclable football pitch

Wembley Stadium has announced that they have developed a 100% recyclable pitch, which is the “first in the world of football”.

The ground staff at England’s national stadium have been working on the project for two years, which includes the repurposing of plastic from the pitch.

A new solution for football – a recyclable pitch

Recycling modern-day football pitches has been an increasing problem for ground staff in recent years. A lot of pitches are made out of a hybrid of grass and synthetic plastic. The plastic in pitches means they do not break down naturally, and as a result, they are sent to waste landfill sites when they can no longer be used.

However, Wembley Stadium has created a pitch where the plastic can be repurposed. The first thing they created was a bench made entirely out of plastic from the hallowed turf.

Karl Standley is the Grounds Manager at Wembley Stadium. He said: “Extracting the plastic from a hybrid pitch is notoriously difficult, due to its compound and structure. When we first mooted the idea of recycling it, we were told it couldn’t be done. However, we were determined to find a sustainable answer to the problem.

“It’s been a long journey, testing and re-testing, but we have finally come up with a solution we are happy with.

“Creating something from a pitch that has had world class players perform on it is the ultimate memento. I am excited about what else we can possibly create in the future.”

Importance of sustainability at Wembley Stadium

Sustainability at Wembley Stadium has been a priority since opening in 2007. Large parts of the pitch have been recycled back into grassroots pitches, and now the ground staff at Wembley are keen on taking a leading position to encourage more 100% recyclable hybrid pitches across the UK and Europe.

Standley said: “As more stadiums become multi-purpose venues, hosting a variety of sports, music and entertainment shows, there is a need to use more hybrid carpet surfaces throughout the year.

“By ensuring old pitches don’t go to landfill we can create a cycle that will ultimately reduce our impact on the environment and benefit community clubs up and down the country for a long time to come.”


Will Murray

Freelance football journalist. Experience writing for When Saturday, Comes, Goalkeeper.com, Elite Scholars and Total Football Analysis. Recently finished an MA in Sport Journalism at the University of Brighton. Long-time season ticket holder at the two-time European Champions Nottingham Forest.

Articles: 244