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What are the 10 biggest stadiums in Africa?

The Africa Cup of Nations takes place in the Ivory Coast in January 2024. Six different stadiums will host matches in five cities across the country with the largest being the Alassane Ouattara Stadium which holds 60,000 people.

The Alassane Ouattara will also host the Afcon 2023 final at the beginning of February, but where does it rank in terms of the ten biggest stadiums in Africa? Let's find out…

The 10 biggest stadiums in Africa – ranked

FNB Stadium – South Africa – 94,736

The largest football ground in Africa is the FNB Stadium in Nasrec, South Africa. The stadium was renovated and expanded in 2009 ahead of the 2010 World Cup and has a capacity of 94,736. The stadium is the home ground of Kaizer Chiefs and hosts important fixtures for the South African national team. The FNB has also hosted some South Africa international rugby matches.

The biggest match to be played at the FNB Stadium was the FIFA World Cup final in 2010. Spain played the Netherlands, with Andres Iniesta scoring the winner in extra-time in front of a capacity crowd at Soccer City, as it is known locally.

New Administrative Capital Stadium – Egypt – 90,000

The second biggest stadium in Africa is the New Administrative Capital Stadium in Egypt. It's still yet to host a football match with completion still pending but once it gets the green light, it will become Egypt's National Stadium with a capacity of 90,000. The Egyptian government have spent 40bn on the stadium and its surrounding area with a potential World Cup bid looming for the nation.

Borg el-Arab Stadium – Egypt – 86,000

With the New Administrative Capital Stadium still not officially open, the Borg el-Arab is technically still the largest football ground in Egypt, with a capacity of 86,000. It was officially opened in 2009 and the Egyptian national team frequently play their matches here. The stadium is situated in Amreya with local side Smouha also playing home matches here.

Stade des Martyrs – Democratic Republic of Congo – 80,000

The fourth largest African football ground is the Stade des Martyrs in the Democratic Republic of Congo. It's the Congolese national football stadium with the international side playing their home matches here since the 1990s. The ground holds 80,000 people with club sides AS Vita Club and DCMP using it during the domestic season.

Cairo International Stadium – Egypt – 75,000

Rounding off the top five is the Cairo International Stadium in Egypt, meaning three of Africa's biggest stadia can be found in Egypt. The Cairo International Stadium has a current capacity of 75,000 but once packed in 120,000 fans for a match in 1986.

Despite being smaller than the Borg el-Arab, the Cairo International Stadium is still regarded as Egypt's national ground with the 2019 Africa Cup of Nations final taking place here.

Cairo International Stadium
Cairo International Stadium before the 2019 African Nations Cup final – Photo by Icon Sport

Ibn Batouta Stadium – Morocco – 68,000

Morocco's Ibn Batouta Stadium is the sixth largest stadium in Africa with a capacity of 68,000. Built back in 2011 with an initial capacity of 45,000, it has since been increased by more than 20,000 seats ahead of Morocco hosting the 2023 FIFA Club World Cup and 2030 World Cup. The Morocco national team play selected matches here with Ittihad Tanger using it for domestic purposes.

Stade du 5 Juillet – Algeria – 64,200

In light of the extension to the Ibn Batouta Stadium, Algeria's Stade du 5 Juillet has been bumped from sixth to seventh in the top ten biggest stadiums in Africa. The Stade du 5 Juillet has a current capacity of 64,200 but once held 110,000 for a match between Algeria and Serbia in 2010. The stadium has seen many renovations over the years due to health and safety concerns.

Ellis Park – South Africa – 62,567

Ellis Park may only be the eighth biggest stadium in Africa but it is arguably its most iconic. The stadium is perhaps better known for hosting Rugby matches with it being the location for South Africa's World Cup triumph in 1995.

The South African football team have also played games here in the past, more so before the FNB Stadium was opened. Its current capacity stands at 62,567.

A shot of Ellis Park from high up, inside the stadium | One of the biggest stadiums in Africa
Ellis Park | Photo by Icon Sport

Moshood Abiola National Stadium – Nigeria – 60,491

The Moshood Abiola National Stadium is Nigeria's national stadium and can hold up to 60,491 people. The stadium opened in 2003 and has been exclusively used by the Nigerian national team ever since. When Nigeria aren't playing there, the Moshood Abiola is used for religious conferences and concerts.

Alassan Ouattara Stadium – Ivory Coast – 60,000

Coming in tenth place is the Alassane Ouattara Stadium in the Ivory Coast, which holds 60,000 people and was opened just three years ago. The ground has become the home of the Ivory Coast national team and will host several matches at the upcoming African Cup of Nations, including the final.

What is the largest stadium in Africa?

1

FNB Stadium

94,736

Johannesburg

South Africa

2

New Administrative Capital Stadium

93,940

New Administrative Capital

Egypt

3

Borg el-Arab Stadium

86,000

Alexandria

Egypt

4

Stade des Martyrs

80,000

Kinshasa

DR Congo

5

Cairo International Stadium

75,000

Cairo

Egypt

6

Ibn Batouta Stadium

65,000

Tangier

Morocco

7

Stade du 5 Juillet

64,200

Algiers

Algeria

8

Ellis Park Stadium

62,567

Johannesburg

South Africa

9

Abuja Stadium

60,491

Abuja

Nigeria

10

Stade 7 November

60,000

Radès

Tunisia

11

Alassane Ouattara Stadium

60,000

Abidjan

Ivory Coast

12

Stade Municipal de Kintélé

60,000

Brazzaville

Congo

13

National Stadium

60,000

Dar es-Salaam

Tanzania

14

Paul Biya Stadium

60,000

Yaoundé

Cameroon

15

Heroes National Stadium

60,000

Lusaka

Zambia


Andy Delaney

Andy is a freelance sports writer with ten years of experience covering major sporting events across Europe. He has also been a season ticket holder at Old Trafford since 2008 and has visited over 40 football stadiums in the United Kingdom and abroad following the Reds.

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